Nutritional support in fibromyalgia

 Being a condition that makes it difficult to carry out daily activities (eg going to the supermarket, cooking, physical exercise) tends to contribute to overweight or obesity, and with it, metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus 

Fibromyalgia is a known, but poorly understood condition. Since 1904 he is known, called fibrositis, which Graham (1950) calls “pain syndrome” until the mid-1970s when the term fibromyalgia we know today is adopted . (Bellato, 2012)

But do we really know about fibromyalgia?

Let’s start by defining it as a syndrome (set of signs and symptoms), chronic (long-lasting) characterized by generalized body pain, fatigue, sleep disorders and poor concentration. (Sanam, 2017)
It occurs in 2% of the population, with women being the most affected, in ages between 40-60 years, although it can occur at any age.

The pain can be felt in the skin, muscle and joints, describing some “pain points” that characterize the condition. For the diagnosis, we do not have a laboratory test or image that shows the alteration or the affected organ, because the specific cause of the disease remains controversial, being an adequate medical history that brings us closer to the diagnosis.

The scientific evidence relates fibromyalgia to the nervous system, as well as to genetic factors and the autoimmune system. “Central sensitization” is one of the concepts used to describe the etiology of the disease. (Holton, 2016)

Being a condition that makes it difficult to carry out daily activities (eg going to the supermarket, cooking, physical exercise) tends to contribute to overweight or obesity, and with it, metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus.

Currently the pharmacological treatment does not provide a complete improvement, which has linked to the diet as a possible modulator that allows reducing symptoms.

There are two amino acids, glutamate and aspartate, which function as neurotransmitters, being able to identify in foods as meats (in their combined form) or free, in food preservatives (eg monosodium glutamate, yeast extract, aspartame (artificial sweetener in dietary sodas )). Also, we can find them in soy sauce and cured cheeses (eg parmesan). It is suggested, then, that a high blood concentration of these amino acids could alter the excitation in the central nervous system and is part of the causes of fibromyalgia. Also, the deficiency of micronutrients such as magnesium, zinc and vitamin B6.

Maintaining weight control is essential, as some reviews discuss whether fibromyalgia is the cause or consequence of a state of overweight or obesity. The dietary recommendation consists essentially of the contribution of antioxidants (from daily consumption of fruits and vegetables), sources of omega 3 (fish, nuts) and regular physical activity (swimming, cycling, etc). Also, reduce or avoid the consumption of processed foods and diet sodas to limit preservatives, artificial sweeteners and other related substances.

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